A company must meet stringent requirements in order to be a member of NADCA. The company must:

  • Have at least one NADCA certified Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) on staff
  • Maintain at least $500,000 in general liability insurance
  • Agree to clean according to NADCA's standards and comply with NADCA's Code of Ethics. If a company is not going to clean according to NADCA's standards, this must be communicated to the buyer at the time of sale.

These requirements were established to provide a higher level of assurance to consumers. Visit www.nadca.com to locate a NADCA member in your area.

Proper HVAC Cleaning Process

There are two key components to HVAC cleaning: breaking contaminants loose, and collection of contaminants.

Air Duct Cleaning

Breaking Contaminants Loose

Properly cleaning HVAC systems requires removing the sources of contamination. Source removal begins with use of one or more agitation devices designed to loosen contaminants from the surfaces within the heating and air-conditioning system. Examples of agitation devices include brushes, air whips, and compressed air nozzles or “skipper balls.” Agitation can also be achieved through hand-brushing or contact vacuuming.

Air Duct Cleaning

Collection of Contaminants

During cleaning, the entire HVAC system is placed under continuous negative pressure (vacuum) to prevent the spread of contaminants. Continuous negative pressure allows very fine particles to be removed from the system as they become airborne, ensuring that these particles are not released into the living space when the system is turned on after cleaning. This negative pressure also serves to extract the loosened contaminants, which are collected and removed from your home.